Autoscaling of Docker Containers in Google Kubernetes Engine

The name Kubernetes comes originally from the Greek word for helmsman. It is the person who steers a ship or boat. Representing a steering wheel, the Kubernetes logo was most likely inspired by it. [1

The choice of the name can also be interpreted to mean that Kubernetes (the helmsman) steers a ship that contains several containers (e.g. docker containers). It is therefore responsible for bringing these containers safely to their destination (to ensure that the journey goes smoothly) and for orchestrating them.

Apparently Kubernetes was called Seven of Nine within Google. The Star Trek fans under us should be familiar with this reference. Having 7 spikes, there might be a connection between the logo and this name. [2]

This blog post was created during the master lecture System Engineering and Management. In this lecture we deal with topics that are of interest to us and with which we would like to conduct experiments. We have already worked with docker containers very often and appreciate the advantages. Of course we have also worked with several containers within a closed system orchestrated by Docker-Compose configurations. Nevertheless, especially in connection with scaling and the big companies like Netflix or Amazon, you hear the buzzword Kubernetes and quickly find out that a distribution of a system to several nodes requires a platform such as Kubernetes.

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Social Bots – An Attack on Democracy?

Election campaigns are increasingly carried out in social networks to influence voters. Social bots are being used for this purpose, which raises the question of how much influence they have on voters and whether they can even endanger a democracy. Furthermore, the question arises as to who can be held responsible for this and how users of social networks can protect themselves against social bots.

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