Multiplayer TypeScript Application run on AWS Services

Daniel Kniziadk100@hdm-stuttgart.de
Benjamin Janzen bj009@hdm-stuttgart.de

The project

CatchMe is a location-based multiplayer game for mobile devices. The idea stems from the classic board game Scotland Yard, basically a modern version of hide & seek. You play in a group with up to 5 players outside, where on of the players gets to be chosen the “hunted”. His goal is trying to escape the other players. Through the app he can constantly see the movement of his pursuers, while the other players can only see him in set intervals.


The backend of the game builds on Colyseus, a multiplayer game server for Node.js, which we have adjusted to our needs. There’s a lobby, from which the players can connect into a room with other players and start the game.
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Production Monitoring – Industry 4.0

When I was invited to a design thinking workshop of the summer school of Lucerne – University of Applied Sciences and Arts, I made my first experience with the end user interaction part of Industry 4.0. It was an awesome week with a lot of great people and made me interested in the whole Industry 4.0 theme. So when we did projects in the lecture of cloud development I was sure to do a production monitoring project. Continue reading

Tweets by Donnie - Building a serverless sentiment analysis application with the twitter streaming API, Lambda and Kinesis

tweets-by-donnie dashboard

 

Thinking of Trumps tweets it’s pretty obvious that they are controversial. Trying to gain insights of how controversial his tweets really are, we created tweets-by-donnie.

“It’s freezing and snowing in New York — we need global warming!”
Donald J. Trump

You decide if it’s meant as a joke or not.

But wouldn’t it be nice to know whether the public is seeing this as a joke or whether it’s getting upset by it? That’s where our idea originated from. By measuring the emotions presented in the responses we can see what the public is thinking of Trumps posts throughout the day.

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Building a Serverless Web Service For Music Fingerprinting

Building serverless architectures is hard. At least it was to me in my first attempt to design a loosely coupled system that should, in the long term, mean a good bye to my all-time aversion towards system maintenance.

Music information retrieval is also hard. It is when you attempt to start to grasp the underlying theoretical framework and submerge yourself into scientific papers which each yield a different approach for extracting some feature out of digital audio signals. It is a long way until MFCC starts to sound natural. I have been there.
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Building a fully scalable architecture with AWS

What I learned in building the StateOfVeganism ?

Final setup for the finished project (created with Cloudcraft)

By now, we all know that news and media shape our viewson these discussed topics. Of course, this is different from person to person. Some might be influenced a little more than others, but there always is some opinion communicated.

Considering this, it would be really interesting to see the continuous development of mood communicated towards a specific topic or person in the media.

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Building an HdM Alexa Skill – Part 4

Continuous Integration

This is the last part in our series of blog posts concerning the development of an Alexa Skill. If you missed the previous parts you can catch up by reading part 1 here, part 2 here and part 3 here.

Introduction

Every student group that has worked on a software project can retell the following situation: you’re one week ahead of the deadline, every team member has spent the last weeks working on their part of the project. So far, everything looks great – every module works on its own, the GUI is designed and implemented, the database is modeled and set up, client and server are both running smoothly. All that’s left is combining all the bits and pieces to see everything in action together. Easy, right? Fast forward another five days, it’s the weekend before the final presentation: the air is thick with panic with everyone furiously debugging their code, solving merge conflicts left and right while trying to get the project to some kind of working state that will at least survive the demo. Things that were already working in isolation are now broken and quite a bunch of features that were an inch close to completion will never make it into the presentation. So what has gone wrong? And what have we done to prevent the same from happening with our Alexa Skill?

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Building an HdM Alexa Skill – Part 2

Decisions, Developed Modules and Implementation

If you missed the first part you can catch up by reading it here.

In the second part of our blog post series, we first describe what decisions were made in the course of the development process, then we show which code we actually had to develop on ourselves and finally we give an overview on how we implemented the skill.

So let’s get started with how we ended up from the inital idea of developing a chatbot to the development of an Alexa Skill.

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